THE BEET QUEEN PDF

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Chapter One MARY ADARE. So that's how I came to Argus. I was the girl in the stiff coat. After I ran blind and came to a halt, shocked not to find Karl. The following excerpt is from the opening of The Beet Queen, a novel by Louise Erdrich. Read the passage carefully. Then write awell-developed essay in . The following excerpt is from the opening of The Beet Queen, a novel by Louise Erdrich. Read the passage carefully. Then write a well-developed essay in.


The Beet Queen Pdf

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The beet queen: a novel by Louise Erdrich; 17 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Fiction, Orphans, Accessible book, Protected DAISY, In library; Places: . From award-winning, New York Times bestselling author Louise Erdrich comes this vibrant tale of abandonment and sexual obsession, jealousy, and unstinting. (Louise Erdrich, The Beet Queen). The score should reflect the quality of the essay as a whole — its content, style, and mechanics. Reward the students for what.

Ober singled out for petting. He put me on his lap, called me Schatze. His voice was deep pitched, but I liked the sound of it in counterpoint to or covering my mother's.

Later, after Karl and I were sent to bed, I stayed awake and listened to the grown-up's voices rise and tangle, then fall, first in the downstairs parlor and then, muffled, in the dining room.

The Beet Queen - Part 1, Chapter 1, 1932 Summary & Analysis

I heard both of them walk up the stairs. The big door closed at the end of the hall.

I kept my eyes open. There was darkness, the creaks and thumps that a house makes at night, wind in the branches, tapping. By morning he was gone.

The next day Karl sulked until our mother hugged and kissed him back into good humor. I was sad, too, but with me she was short of temper. Karl always read the comics in the Sunday paper first, and so he was the one who found the picture of Mr.

Ober and his wife on the front page. There had been a grain-loading accident, and Mr. Ober had smothered. Therewas a question, too, of suicide. He'd borrowed heavily against his land. Mother and I were cleaning out drawers in the kitchen, cutting white paper out to fit them, when Karl brought the piece in to show us.

I remember that Adelaide's hair was plaited in two red crooked braids and that she fell full length across the floor when she read the news. Karl and I huddled close to her, and when she opened her eyes. My mother knew she'd lose everything now. His wife was smiling in the photograph.

Our big white house was in Mr. Ober's name, along with everything else except an automobile, which Adelaide sold the next morning. On the day of the funeral, we took the noon train to the Cities with only what we could carry in suitcases.

My mother thought that there, with her figure and good looks, she could find work in a fashionable store. But she didn't know that she was pregnant. She didn't know how much things really cost, or the hard facts of Depression.

After six months the money ran out. We, were desperate. I didn't know how badly off we were until my mother stole a dozen heavy silver spoons from our landlady, who was kind, or at least harbored no grudge against us, and whom my mother counted as a friend. Adelaide gave no explanation for the spoons when I discovered them in her pocket.

Days later they were gone and Karl and I owned thick overcoats. Also, our shelf was loaded with green bananas.

Reprinted with permission by HarperCollins Publishers. All rights reserved. The Beet Queen by by Louise Erdrich. The Book Report Network. Skip to main content. You are here: Ober arrived, we sat with him in the parlor. Karl posed on the horsehair sofa and pretended a fascination with the red diamonds woven into the carpet. As usual, I was the one whom Mr. Ober singled out for petting.

Louise Erdrich

He put me on his lap, called me Schatze. His voice was deep pitched, but I liked the sound of it in counterpoint to or covering my mother's. Later, after Karl and I were sent to bed, I stayed awake and listened to the grown-up's voices rise and tangle, then fall, first in the downstairs parlor and then, muffled, in the dining room.

I heard both of them walk up the stairs. The big door closed at the end of the hall.

I kept my eyes open. There was darkness, the creaks and thumps that a house makes at night, wind in the branches, tapping. By morning he was gone. The next day Karl sulked until our mother hugged and kissed him back into good humor. I was sad, too, but with me she was short of temper. Karl always read the comics in the Sunday paper first, and so he was the one who found the picture of Mr.

The Beet Queen

Ober and his wife on the front page. There had been a grain-loading accident, and Mr. Ober had smothered. Therewas a question, too, of suicide.

He'd borrowed heavily against his land. Mother and I were cleaning out drawers in the kitchen, cutting white paper out to fit them, when Karl brought the piece in to show us. I remember that Adelaide's hair was plaited in two red crooked braids and that she fell full length across the floor when she read the news. Karl and I huddled close to her, and when she opened her eyes I helped her into a chair. Then she looked at Karl.

Karl turned his head away, sullen. So it was out. My mother knew she'd lose everything now. His wife was smiling in the photograph. Our big white house was in Mr. Ober's name, along with everything else except an automobile, which Adelaide sold the next morning. On the day of the funeral, we took the noon train to the Cities with only what we could carry in suitcases. My mother thought that there, with her figure and good looks, she could find work in a fashionable store.

But she didn't know that she was pregnant. She didn't know how much things really cost, or the hard facts of Depression. After six months the money ran out.

We, were desperate.I saw the train pulled like a string of black beads over the horizon, as I have seen it so many times since.

Part 3, Chapter 10, He put me on his lap, called me Schatze. Part 2, Chapter 6, He owned a whole county of Minnesota wheatland. The letter turns out to be a response to some ads Fritzie ran in the Minneapolis papers after Mary came to live with them looking for news on Adelaide or the baby. Part 4, Chapter 14, Free Quiz. The Plague of Doves. Once I had caused a miracle by smashing my face on ice, but now I was an ordinary person.